Call for Papers: The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)–Special Issue “Engaging Disability: Social Science Perspectives on Information and Inclusion”

Call for Papers:
The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)–Special Issue
“Engaging Disability: Social Science Perspectives on Information and Inclusion”
The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) invites submissions for a special issue focused on social scientific perspectives on information and disability inclusion and empowerment. We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to this area of research; this may be empirical, theory-based, methodological, and/or practical in nature, and we encourage international perspectives and collaborations. We will also have a special section for student work, works in progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.
Extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers and up to 500 words for contributions to the special section are due by 30 November 2018 via email to KimThompson@sc.edu. Authors will be notified of acceptance in mid-December, and final papers will be due by 1 April 2019.
 
We seek submissions from different disciplines and perspectives for this special issue of IJIDI. The goal of this special issue is to bring together researchers who focus specifically on Engaging Disability. Topics and themes related to disability and information access may include, but will not be limited to:
• Physical, intellectual, and socio-cultural barriers and supports related to disability, information access, and inclusion
• Analysis of international information policy considerations of disability
• Hidden/invisible/latent disability
• Engaging and including disability in libraries, museums, archives, and other information organizations
• Disability and employment in LIS
• Disability and higher education in LIS
• Faculty and librarians with disabilities: Is technology inclusive or exclusive?
• Accessibility and usability (broadly conceived)
• Children and youth with disabilities in the context of information concepts
• Intersectionality and disability: Exploring multiple identities
• The disability culture: Information and technology issues
 
Kim M. Thompson of the University of South Carolina will be guest editor for this issue, which is scheduled for publication in October 2019. Please contact KimThompson@sc.edu should you have any questions about this call. IJIDI Author Guidelines are available at:http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI/about/submissions#authorGuidelines.
 
Schedule: Call for Papers: October 2018 Extended Abstracts due: 30 November 2018 (with notification of acceptance by mid-December 2018) Accepted Papers due: 1 April 2019 Peer Review: April 2019 Revised Papers due: 1 July 2019 Publication: October 2019 (issue 4)
 
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IDEAL ’19: Advancing Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility in Libraries & Archives to Be Held August 6-7, 2019

1.jpgDo you believe that diversity and inclusion are essential to personal and organizational excellence in the library and archives professions?
Are you doing groundbreaking research on diversity– and inclusion-related topics and want to share it with your colleagues on an international platform?
Mark your calendar for IDEAL ’19 to be held Tuesday–Wednesday, August 6–7, 2019, on The Ohio State University campus in Columbus, Ohio. A call for presentations, posters, and scholarships will follow in February 2019.
IDEAL, formerly the National Diversity in Libraries Conference, aims to foster awareness and appreciation of workplace diversity issues through the exploration of exemplary practice, contemporary theory, thought leadership, and strategy development for all those in the academic and public library, archives, and museum sectors.
IDEAL ’19 will provide an opportunity for professionals at every level and across sectors to discuss how increasing workplace diversity and creating an inclusive workplace environment improves organizational effectiveness, creativity, adaptability, and relevance to the communities served by the organization.
As a result of participating in IDEAL ’19, attendees will be able to:
  • Articulate the value of inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility in academic and public libraries and archives
  • Develop a robust strategy for workplace diversity and inclusion that aligns with organizational or community missions
  • Explore strategies for creating globally inclusive and culturally competent professions
  • See inclusion as a gateway to organizational excellence, social responsibility, and community engagement
  • Contribute to conversations about measuring the effectiveness of efforts to create inclusive, diverse, equitable, and accessible workplaces and communities
Sign up to receive email updates about IDEAL ’19.
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Navigating Law Librarianship While Black: A Week in the Life of a Black Female Law Librarian

The ideal work environment provides a sense of purpose and validation. Inevitably, however, unconscious or implicit biases permeate the workplace because we all have them. These biases can be based on race, age, gender, religion, socioeconomic status, physical disability, and other characteristics. Implicit bias in the workplace can “stymie diversity, recruiting and retention efforts, and unknowingly shape an organization’s culture.”3 People of color, in particular, experience challenges as a result of racial microaggressions in the workplace.

[Link to article]

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Soliciting performance, hiding bias: Whiteness and librarianship

Despite the growing body of research on our professional demographics and multi-year diversity initiatives, librarianship in the United States remains overwhelmingly white. I suggest the interview process is a series of repetitive gestures designed to mimic and reinforce white middle-class values, which ultimately influence the hiring decisions—and relative lack of diversity—of librarianship as a whole. I consider how the whiteness of librarianship may manifest long before the hiring process. By identifying and interrogating the body of white, middle-class values inherent to both librarianship and professional job searching, I offer suggestions to encourage an authentically diverse pool of applicants.

[Link to article]

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Open educational resources librarian – Concordia University

OER Librarian Posting English

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Ethnic and Racial Diversity in Libraries: How White Allies Can Support Arguments for Decolonization

Despite the claim to neutrality, a woeful lack of diversity has had, and continues to have, latent consequences within librarianship and the services we provide. Historically, libraries as a product of white (heterosexual, capitalist, middle-class) librarianship have unwittingly upheld dominant oppressive cultural values by adhering to the tenet of neutrality. Instead, librarians must radically begin supporting our communities by pushing for the removal of institutionalized barriers to entering the information science profession, and divorce ourselves from the notion of neutrality by supporting social justice and civil rights issues. Using discursive analysis as a way to highlight the major scholarly arguments regarding the state of diversity in LIS, I will highlight the ways in which white librarians can better cement ourselves as allies while remaining cognizant of our position as colonizers.

[Link to article]

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White Librarianship in Blackface: Diversity Initiatives in LIS

Whiteness—an ideological practice that can extend beyond notions of racial supremacy to other areas of dominance—has permeated every aspect of librarianship, extending even to the initiatives we claim are committed to increasing diversity. This state of affairs, however, need not remain. This article examines the ways in which whiteness controls diversity initiatives in LIS, particularly in light of the application requirements set upon candidates. I then suggest ways to correct for whiteness in LIS diversity programs by providing mentorship to diverse applicants struggling to navigate the whiteness of the profession and concurrently working in solidarity to dismantle whiteness from within.

[Link to article]

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